Hair Part Statistics

The left part on both men and women is much more standard than the right part – although in sampling large groups of people, the “no part” or center part beats both. Rough statistics from many observations show
about 50% no part,

  • 5-10% bald,
  • 30-40% left part,
  • and less than 5% right part.What I find interesting is that in business, politics and entertainment, the percentages are much different:
  • about 20% middle or no part
  • 5-10% bald,
  • 50-60% left part,
  • and almost 20% right part(!)

What makes the right part so popular in these influential fields?  My belief is that the atypical nature of the right parter’s personality will generate a lot more interest at the beginning – people stand out well if they are interested in standing out. So they get promoted, elected, and swooned over in these fields.

But the old standard still holds strong – a clear majority of influential people are those with left parts – they are traditionally more reliable and “knowable”. Check out this table of newscasters, left vs right – can you see how traditional the left parters are, and how non-traditional the right parters are?

(images coming soon:

left right Tom Brokaw Ted Koppel Brian Williams Anderson Cooper Walter Cronkite Dan Rather Harry Reasoner
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About John Walter

A long long time ago when I was just 19, I discovered the effects of changing my hair part from right to left. The strength of the change - in my case from a social misfit to "Joe Popular" was amazing, and not only that, when I looked around, it was happening to others. The Hair Part Theory was the result of researching the effects and putting it into a more scientific framework and language. My sister Catherine Walter was instrumental in getting my vague handwaving theories into a great paper, including a slew of statistics to illustrate just how many leaders we have that are hair parters! A few years after discovering the Hair Part Theory, I discovered, or more accurately re-discovered a true image mirror - and recognized myself at a deep level. The full story is elsewhere on this blog (link coming), but suffice to say that the True Mirror (the trade name of my perfect version), reflects your hair part the way it actually is, and you can see exactly what you are projecting...it matters!
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3 Responses to Hair Part Statistics

  1. Katie says:

    I’ve noticed that the majority of people with hair parts are left-parted.

    • John Walter says:

      Hi – yes, that is what I see most of the time – although when you look at groups of people (like Congress https://hairparttheory.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/hairpartsbycategory.pdf) the amounts are more heavily weighted towards those having hair parts (85% of the Senate parts either right or left, and only 9% centered or no part), whereas in the general public its more common to have no hair part than the side part. But yes, if you part your hair at all, chances are it is on the left

    • John Walter says:

      Its hard to pin down exact numbers because the percentages change with different demographics, but overall my best estimate for men is that 40% part on the left, 10-15% are bald, 40-50% dont part at all or part in the middle, and only 3-5% part on the right. Its interesting to note that in the public sphere, the percentages are roughly 60% left, 20% right, 10% bald and only 10% no part or middle. Seems that the side part acts as an attention getter for many, which allows people to stand out and get the job. But my opinion is that its at a cost – theres a lack of balance that happens with side parts, especially in the case of those that keep the same side their whole life, which is more typical for men than women.

      Its really hard to figure the percentages for women, especially because they change very frequently, but again, my best estimate is its about 40% left, 30% right and 30% middle or straight back

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